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Project: Legend of Zelda Bow Tie

This lovely fabric was bought as a remnant from Ebay absolutely ages ago and was originally intended to cover a lampshade. After much deliberation, swearing and an accident involving glue, I decided that it wasn’t something that I wanted to pursue at the moment – I tend to try and add too many feathers to my bow (is that the phrase – or is it arrows in a quiver?) and felt it better to sideline this for the time being.

So instead I did a really sensible thing and agreed to do something else that I hadn’t done before which was even harder! This all came about after posting the fabric to my Twitter feed and asking for some opinions. Sam the scientist got in touch and asked if I made bow ties…he is quite the bow tie aficionado! I replied that I hadn’t but I would certainly be prepared to have a go if he was willing to let me use him as a guinea pig for what could be a Frankenstein’s monster creation. Deal struck and I went pattern hunting.

Finding a pattern for an old fashioned, hard to tie bow tie was really easy, but finding something concrete for a pre-tied bow tie was a little trickier. In the end, I found that Pinterest and other sewing blogs were really invaluable. I literally read through tons of these and picked out a few bits I liked and mashed them together to create myself a little bow tie set up.

The bow itself was the easiest part of the make. It needed interfacing otherwise it looked very floppy and didn’t hold any sort of shape. The dapper gentleman obviously doesn’t want that (!) so an iron on interfacing was added. Then a rectangle was sewn up and pinched at the centre section in order to get the shape right. I pressed again at this point to really fuse the interfacing and get a crisp shape to hold.

I then sewed a strip of fabric for the neck strap and another for the “knot” of the bow to make it look very authentic. I initially intended to use a Velcro fastener but the anxiety about the fit (especially if the fabric gave a little while wearing) led me to decide that it would be best to order a proper bow tie fastening kit in order to provide neck measurement adjustability and a smart hook fastening. With kids bow ties, Velcro is much preferred as there is no danger of swallowing it or any sort of lethal eye injury from the hook and I wanted this to be a smart and sophisticated piece while having the fun gaming element in the design. Velcro on an adult bow tie just didn’t fit the bill so I ordered a black metal fastener set which was just a couple of pounds from Ebay and arrived within 48 hours.

Now this was the bit that took the time. It was really, REALLY hard to find clear instructions for how to attach the fastenings to the strap so that the darn thing would be adjustable. I must have spent 3 hours JUST on this part of the make. Most instructions gave a sort of verbal diarrhoea of twists and turns and I ended up going back to what I do best which is plain and simple experimenting. There was nothing else for it because I needed to trust my instincts. Mercifully I finally got the hang of it and finished the make just in time. It will now reach Sam the scientist in time for his science conference at Google this coming week.

 

I’m just hoping it sits well when worn and isn’t too ‘forward heavy’. Perhaps the collar of the shirt itself will help with this (having┬ánever worn a bow tie, it was difficult to know if this was the case!).

Lets hope Sam enjoys his piece and can I thank him for his patience with a longer making period than first predicted. It doesn’t do to send out a product you aren’t happy with and so I wanted to take my time to get this one just right. Here are my top 5 tips for a bow tie creation:

  1. Always have a trial run of your make with some old scraps of fabric and not your best and final. This makes experimenting less painful
  2. An extra press of the iron to define the shape of the bow is helpful
  3. Hand sew any tiny areas to avoid a messy result
  4. Have a proper fastening method for adult bow ties – Velcro isn’t going to hold its own on a grown up neck
  5. Make sure there is a plan B, particularly if you have a deadline to work to.

Hope you enjoy the pictures, feel free to comment if you’ve ever made a bow/bow tie and have any top tips of your own!

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Project: Zelda ‘Link’ Cushion

Hi there. It is such a hot day here that having an old and hot sewing machine really hasn’t worked to my advantage but I successfully sorted a project out that I’ve been waiting to do for ages. Now that we have moved things about at home and I have more room to get my machine out whenever I want to, it is so much easier to snatch opportunities as they arise.

 

 

My current machine – Bernina Minimatic 870. It’s old and temperamental but we have an understanding!

I ordered a remnant from eBay quite some time ago now that was just screaming to be used. It was a ‘fat quarter’ size but didn’t have very straight cuts so it needed thought as to how best to use the fabric. I decided that as I had some poly-cotton oddments in black and this Zelda fabric, a cushion cover would be a safe bet. I had a spare cushion pad that measured 40 x 40cm which was ideal for the fabric pieces that I had. Plus, I’m ever the one for using every scrap of fabric possible and hate to throw anything away. This size left me a nice simple strip of fabric over from the Zelda fat quarter which I aim to turn in to something new soon (I have a plan but I need a pattern).

 

Peekaboo! The motif is vibrant without being garish.

This project took about 2.5-3 hours as I wasn’t using a pattern (although I had made this type of cover before). The two pieces of 40 x 40cm were the first to be joined (with a standard allowance added when cutting) using a simple black cotton and a running stitch down the bottom of the cover and 1/3 of the way up each side. I then attached the overlap flap to the top of the cover and joined it to the remaining open sides. All visible seams were made neat before the joining process so that where the overlap was looked tidy and crisp.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Not a particularly challenging project but I think the pattern looks well centred. The range of colours in the print are going to compliment lots of different existing decors and the design is really pretty without being too feminine.

I realised as I turned the item out that the bottom flap overlapped the top rather than the traditional vice versa. I considered unpicking but actually it looks perfectly fine and there is no sag or puckering as a result. I haven’t added a Velcro fastening because as someone who has animals, a child and cushions with Velcro on…it collects hair, cheerios and fuzzy felts. The cover fits the cushion I have well, however there is a little wiggle room to account for any variation in the chosen filling (Feather cushions tend to make a much plumper cushion for example).

 

Looks gorgeous on my office chair!

 

I will be selling these in the shop either as stock or to order and will be available with or without the cushion filling (useful for those wishing to recycle existing cushion fillings or keep costs down a little). I’d love to hear what you think and what sort of cushion you would order for your own home!